The Social Factory

the blog of King's CMCI PostGrad Society


What Natalie did next…or life after The CMCI Social Factory

For anyone who doesn’t already know, I’m no longer running the CMCI blog but since September I’ve been running social media for the Women’s Film and Television History Network. They asked us to write about our experiences so far. If you’re interested you can see the blog here and find out more about the Network. thanks, Natalie

Women's Film and Television History Network-UK/Ireland

WFTHN Facebook

We are the new(ish) faces behind WFTHN’s social media. We took over the running of WFTHN’s Facebook and Twitter accounts in September 2014. We are both PhD students and Graduate Teaching Assistants. Natalie has worked in the UK film industry for many years, including as a Senior Development Executive at the UK Film Council and for Granada Film.

SMOsNatalie is at King’s College London and her research is attempting to unpack why there are so few female screenwriters in the UK film industry, and why it’s not changing despite increased interest in gender inequality. Hannah is at the University of Warwick. Her archival-based research explores the work of “message movie” producers and the gendered construction of liberalism in mid-century Hollywood.

Since we took over our Facebook followers have increased from 317 to 417 at time of writing, and Twitter followers are up from 126 to 265.  If you’ve recently joined…

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Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference 2014

Read Tamsyn Dent’s report on the panel she did with CMCI’s Bridget Conor and Natalie Wreyford at the Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference 2014. The panel was entitled “Forget the female, take that away from my job title, I’m a writer and I expect to be treated the same’: Challenging myths of participation in creative work. Reflecting too perhaps, Nicki Menaj’s comments yesterday that she no longer wants to be considered just a “female rapper”.

Tamsyn Dent

Conferences are a great way to get away from the computer screen, share ideas, thoughts on research and catch up with other academics from related fields so I felt very honoured to have a paper accepted as part of a panel presentation on the 2nd ‘Doing Women’s Film and Television History’ conference organised by a committee of academics from the Women’s Film and Television History Network (click on link to take you straight to their site).

The purpose of this conference is to provide a space for academics, activists and industry professionals to consider the specific contribution of women to film and television. Given that women have been significantly contributing to film and television for over a hundred years, it is perhaps a little depressing that this is only the second year that the conference has been running but here’s hoping that its scope and status continues to develop into…

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SEX AND THE CITY TEN YEARS ON: LANDMARK TELEVISION AND ITS LEGACY report by Hannah Hamad

Hannah Hamad reports on the ‘Sex and the City Ten Years On’ conference at the University of Roehampton:

satc

“Springtime in London [it’s not New York but… ]. It’s the tenth anniversary of the broadcast of the final season of Sex and the City (1998-2004), I’m gathered with a group of scholars for a conference exploring its cultural afterlife, and I can’t help but wonder… Have scholars said everything there is to say about Sex and the City? [not at all] What is its legacy for television and the cultural landscape?[complex and multi-faceted] And will every paper be full of rhetorical questions and delivered in the style of one of Carrie Bradshaw’s ponderous columns? [mercifully not]…”  

Click to continue reading…

Hannah Hamad is Lecturer in Film Studies at King’s College London. She is the author ofPostfeminism and Paternity in Contemporary US Film: Framing Fatherhood (New York and London: Routledge, 2014), as well as various articles on postfeminist media culture, UK reality TV, Hollywood cinema and contemporary stardom and celebrity.