The Social Factory

the blog of King's CMCI PostGrad Society


Calling all Sweetcorn Club agents…

Okay so this quite possibly should not be going on this blog but then again apparently I am organising it now so maybe this is part of the “new regime”.

After todays seminar, prompted no doubt by the somewhat depressing prospect that the monetary value of our creative labours are going to be sucked up by the ubiquitous neo-liberal beast, we got talking about money and making it. And so here’s a little business plan as promised with the organic veg thing. I have taken the liberty to call ourselves the Sweetcorn Club after the distribution of the arguably very nice sweetcorn I brought in the other week. Please can someone get that picture up on the blog so we can all see it!

So a car arrives outside Kings at 1pm on Wednesdays. There’s about 8 of us new PhD people – so we have 80 bags – 10 for each person/agent. Each of us takes 10 bags and distributes them to people who have ordered through us around Kings.

The maths/money..

Each bag sells for £10 (maybe £12.50 for richer people like the VC?!). The cost is £6 each so each person makes a nice £40 for say 15 minutes work. Well that’s like £160/hr which is.. what ,40 times more than the £4/hour that PhD people get paid for doing teaching, taking into account preparations etc (or is it £5/hr .. whatever – it’s not that great).

Sounds pretty good to me. If you’re interested the inaugural meeting of the Sweetcorn Club will take place – after the seminar next week?

If all this seems a bit tricky let me finish this post with an antidote to all that post-modernist miserablism, from Nelson Mandala

“Things seem impossible till they happen” – and well who would want to argue with Nelson on that score.

Roger

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Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference 2014

Read Tamsyn Dent’s report on the panel she did with CMCI’s Bridget Conor and Natalie Wreyford at the Doing Women’s Film and Television History Conference 2014. The panel was entitled “Forget the female, take that away from my job title, I’m a writer and I expect to be treated the same’: Challenging myths of participation in creative work. Reflecting too perhaps, Nicki Menaj’s comments yesterday that she no longer wants to be considered just a “female rapper”.

Tamsyn Dent

Conferences are a great way to get away from the computer screen, share ideas, thoughts on research and catch up with other academics from related fields so I felt very honoured to have a paper accepted as part of a panel presentation on the 2nd ‘Doing Women’s Film and Television History’ conference organised by a committee of academics from the Women’s Film and Television History Network (click on link to take you straight to their site).

The purpose of this conference is to provide a space for academics, activists and industry professionals to consider the specific contribution of women to film and television. Given that women have been significantly contributing to film and television for over a hundred years, it is perhaps a little depressing that this is only the second year that the conference has been running but here’s hoping that its scope and status continues to develop into…

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CFP: Creating Cultures: Postgraduate conference in Culture, Media, and the Creative Industries, King’s College London

CFP: Creating Cultures: Postgraduate conference in Culture, Media, and the Creative Industries, King’s College London

Keynote speaker: Prof. Lev Manovich, CUNY

Held on the 12th and 13th of June 2014, this multi-disciplinary postgraduate conference seeks a broad array of perspectives that explore cultural representations, practices, and industries. The title ‘Creating Cultures’ prompts inquiries into concepts of culture being created, cultures of creativity, cultures evolving and changing, and also cultures of creative work and play.

Culture evokes ideas about its conflicting and disputed foundations, and culture as a medium through which social, political, spatial, and historical meanings are communicated and understood. The theme of this conference invites explorations of power relations, gender, subjectivity, the spatial, technology and contemporary media.

Abstract submissions for presentations and pre-formed panels are invited on themes in cultural and/or media studies, such as:

Power and cultural politics

Identity and representation

Media and mediation

Digital cultures, new media, and media futures

Cultures and change

Popular culture

Contested and counter cultures

Art and artistic practice

Cultural labour and industries

Territorial and spatial cultures

Globalisation and transnational cultures

Cultural and media research methodologies

Please submit 300 word abstracts, or proposals for creative presentation formats, and a maximum 100-word biography to cmci-conference@kcl.ac.uk by the 28th of March. Decisions on submissions will be sent by the 17th of April.

For any queries contact: Jeremy Matthew (jeremy.matthew@kcl.ac.uk) or Photini Vrikki (photini.vrikki@kcl.ac.uk)


The Libidinal Economy of Music Videos by Toby Bennett

In 1981, Video famously Killed the Radio Star with the launch of MTV. This was supposed to be pop music’s moment of Wagnerian spectacle, the harmonious integration of artforms in glorious technicolour – and, yes, there are plenty of examples that live up to such a claim. But it turns out that if you chisel away at a Gesamtkunstwerk for long enough, then all you’re left with is twerk. It’s a familiar story: MTV now rarely shows music videos (even if it does sync music harder and faster than almost anyone else), online streaming sites have become the medium of choice, and videos themselves are talked about in terms of their view-count far more than their creativity. So, over thirty years later, has YouTube finally killed the music video?

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